testimony


testimony
Evidence given by a competent witness under oath or affirmation; as distinguished from evidence derived from writings, and other sources. Testimony is particular kind of evidence that comes to tribunal through live witnesses speaking under oath or affirmation in presence of tribunal, judicial or quasi-judicial. State v. Ricci, 107 R.I. 582, 268 A.2d 692, 697
In common parlance, "testimony" and "evidence" are synonymous.
Testimony properly means only such evidence as is delivered by a witness on the trial of a cause, either orally or in the form of affidavits or depositions.
See also character evidence
- opinion evidence or testimony
- evidence (expert evidence);
@ negative testimony
Testimony not bearing directly upon the immediate fact or occurrence under consideration, but evidencing facts from which it may be inferred that the act or fact in question could not possibly have happened.
@ positive testimony
Direct testimony that a thing did or did not happen
@

Black's law dictionary. . 1990.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • testimony — tes·ti·mo·ny / tes tə ˌmō nē/ n pl nies [Latin testimonium, from testis witness]: evidence furnished by a witness under oath or affirmation and either orally or in an affidavit or deposition former testimony: testimony that a witness gives at a… …   Law dictionary

  • Testimony — Tes ti*mo*ny, n.; pl. {Testimonies}. [L. testimonium, from testis a witness: cf. OF. testimoine, testemoine, testimonie. See {Testify}.] 1. A solemn declaration or affirmation made for the purpose of establishing or proving some fact. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • testimony — tes‧ti‧mo‧ny [ˈtestməni ǁ moʊni] noun testimonies PLURALFORM [countable, uncountable] LAW a formal statement that something is true, such as the one a witness makes in a court of law: • In her testimony, she denied that she knew about the… …   Financial and business terms

  • testimony — late 14c., the Ten Commandments, from L.L. testimonium (Vulgate), along with Gk. to martyrion (Septuagint), translations of Heb. eduth attestation, testimony (of the Decalogue), from ed witness. Meaning evidence, statement of a witness first… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Testimony — Tes ti*mo*ny, v. t. To witness; to attest; to prove by testimony. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • testimony — [tes′tə mō΄nē] n. pl. testimonies [ME < L testimonium < testis, a witness: see TESTIFY] 1. a declaration or statement made under oath or affirmation by a witness in a court, often in response to questioning, to establish a fact 2. any… …   English World dictionary

  • testimony — *evidence, deposition, affidavit Analogous words: trial, test, proof, demonstration (see under PROVE): witnessing or witness, attesting or attestation, certifying or certification, vouching for (see corresponding verbs at CERTIFY) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • testimony — [n] declaration about truth; proof affidavit, affirmation, attestation, avowal, confirmation, corroboration, data, demonstration, deposition, documentation, evidence, facts, grounds, illustration, indication, information, manifestation,… …   New thesaurus

  • testimony — ► NOUN (pl. testimonies) 1) a formal statement, especially one given in a court of law. 2) evidence or proof of something. ORIGIN Latin testimonium …   English terms dictionary

  • Testimony — Testify redirects here. For other uses, see Testify (disambiguation) and Testimony (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • testimony — n. 1) to give, offer testimony 2) to cite testimony 3) to recant, repudiate, retract (one s) testimony 4) to contradict, discount, refute testimony 5) false, perjured; reliable testimony 6) testimony about 7) testimony against; for, on behalf of… …   Combinatory dictionary


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